Why I (probably) won’t enter awards anymore

Entering awards is expensive.

It typically costs around $500 (if not more) each time I enter an awards program. Sometimes you have to pay a separate fee for each category the project is entered into.

It’s a bit self-congratulatory.

Like giving yourself a big pat on the back for just doing your job; does that really deserve an award?

I don’t think prospective clients really care.

Most of my client referrals come from previous clients, who probably wouldn't recommend you to others if you aren't very good. Besides, if you do happen to win, your peers will either be jealous or say you didn’t deserve it.

It takes a team to complete a successful building.

Often awards don't acknowledge all of the parties involved to bring a project to fruition. For example, structural engineers make sure the building doesn't fall down, but they don't get a lot of recognition for their (important) work.

Awards are inevitably political in nature.

I've frequently heard whisperings along the lines of "so-and-so will get the award this year because they missed out last year/it's their turn/they will crack the shits if we don't."

You only need to win one award to say you are an award winning architect.

Need I say more?

You only need to win two awards to say you’re a multi-award winning architect.

Done that too!

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Q&A: Design Advice for an Outdoor Living Area?

Q: We’re looking to build a new outdoor entertaining area applying passive solar techniques. We want to make sure that it doesn’t get too hot in summer – would a whirlybird in the roof help? We also like lots of winter sun for warmth, but also want the area to be covered and dry. Any design ideas or advice?READ MORE